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Medicaid Planning FAQ: Why is Medicaid Different in Each State?

Medicaid Planning FAQ: Why is Medicaid Different in Each State?

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elder law, elder law attorney, elder law planning, estate planning attorney, florida elder law attorney, Medicaid planning, florida Medicaid planningDo you know Medicaid is a federal program? That means that the federal government sets the overall rules for the program. Since Medicaid is a federal program, many find it confusing that Medicaid varies from state to state. The reason Medicaid is different depending on your state of residency is because each state administers its own Medicaid benefits. One of the essential rules determined at the federal level states there is no minimum residency eligibility to apply for Medicaid benefits. You can apply for Medicaid benefits the same day you move to a new state.

Defining State to State Transfer Rules: Since each state has its own set of eligibility requirements, it’s not as easy as some think when they consider Medicaid as a “federally administered program.” As a joint benefit provided by both the federal and state governments, it is a little more complicated. The Medicaid State to State transfer rules provide guidance for transferring Medicaid benefits from one state to another. This comes in handy when a participant already receiving Medicaid benefits moves out of state and wishes to retain their Medicaid benefits in their new location.

How Do Medicaid State to State Transfer Rules Work? First, it is essential to realize that Medicaid benefits do not directly transfer from one state to another regardless of the reason for the move. Second, one individual may not receive Medicaid benefits in two states at the same time. The Medicaid participant must close their Medicaid benefits in their originating state to apply for Medicaid benefits in their new state of residence. Since there is no minimum residence eligibility, Medicaid applicants can apply for benefits as early as the same day they move to their new state.

How to Transfer Medicaid Benefits From One State to Another: If you or someone you love is a Medicaid participant and planning to move to Florida and you would like to minimize the delay between Medicaid programs, get in touch with an experienced the Florida Medicaid Planning attorney. They can assist you in transferring your benefits, providing information on income eligibility criteria, level of care requirements, etc. For instance, being medically eligible in one state does not necessarily mean you will be medically eligible in another state. This could affect your benefits.

If you are planning to move to Florida and you need to discuss Florida Medicaid eligibility or how to transfer your Medicaid benefits to Florida, please get in touch with one of the experienced Medicaid Planning attorneys at the Elder Solutions Law Firm today.